CH Robotics Releases Low-Cost GPS-Aided AHRS

GP9-Hand-Top-View-400x400
Today CH Robotics released the GP9, a GPS-Aided AHRS that produces reliable position, velocity, attitude, and heading estimates on dynamic platforms.

Typically, low-cost attitude sensors rely on a combination of data from accelerometers, rate gyros, and magnetometers to produce attitude and heading estimates. These attitude sensors tend to work best on slow-moving, slowly-accelerating platforms. Aggressive dynamic maneuvers can cause these low-cost attitude sensors to function poorly.

The GP9 uses its onboard GPS to solve these problems. The GP9 uses its attitude estimate in conjunction with the onboard accelerometers to measure changes in velocity. These velocity estimates are then compared to velocities reported by the GPS and pressure sensors. Since attitude inaccuracy is a major source of velocity measurement error, it is possible to measure attitude by comparing the accelerometer-based velocity with GPS-based velocity. Because attitude correction takes place as the result of changes in velocity, the GP9 actually performs better during aggressive acceleration and deceleration. Other comparably-priced sensors on the market produce estimates that can become arbitrarily poor on moving platforms.

The GP9 also provides yaw and heading outputs without the use of magnetometers.  Magnetometers are often used to estimate yaw by measuring the Earth’s magnetic field.  However, magnetometer measurements are notoriously unreliable, especially on or near the ground.  The GP9 measures yaw without relying on magnetic sensors.

In order to produce the best possible accuracy, the GP9 doesn’t just estimate angles – it also estimates biases that can cause angle estimates to drift. The onboard bias estimators ensure that the GP9’s angle outputs remain reliable for as long as possible even when the sensor is not moving.

The GP9 is available for order immediately.  Pre-orders are shipping now, and additional orders will ship in January, 2015.

About CH Robotics

CH Robotics specializes in the development of attitude and heading sensors for industrial, commercial, and research applications. By taking advantage of state-of-the-art MEMS sensing technology in conjunction with a rapidly growing market for low-cost inertial and orientation sensors, CH Robotics delivers high performance sensors at industry-leading prices.

CH Robotics Wins Air Force Contract to Develop Drone Gliders

CH Robotics Selected by United States Air Force to Develop Low-cost Autopilot for Covert, Precision, Aerial Delivery System

Phase I CPADS gliderCH Robotics LLC and SeaLandAire Technologies Inc. were selected by the United States Air Force for a Phase II SBIR to design a Covert, Precision Aerial Delivery System (CPADS) for air-based resupply. CPADS technology is designed to reduce costs and add covertness, payload modularity, platform interchangeability, and standoff distance to current airborne delivery technologies (ref. Army PEGASYS and Air Force PADS).

The CH Robotics/SeaLandAire solution to the CPADS problem utilizes an autonomous, covert, tandem wing glider
design to deliver payloads to the ground with a high degree of accuracy. A glider‐based delivery system increases covertness because it is unpowered and it reduces system cost because no active propulsion is required. In addition, landing the aircraft is simplified by performing an automated stall and parachute deployment maneuver just above the payload delivery site, ensuring that the payload is delivered safely even in unforgiving terrain. To improve operational autonomy, the onboard autopilot handles all delivery tasks from deployment to landing, making the entire operation as simple as dropping a parachute would be.
Phase I  CPADS Simulation

During Phase I of the project, CH Robotics developed the path planning and control algorithms needed to control the CPADS glider.  The algorithms were simulated extensively to test their performance under a wide variety of operating conditions (including changing standoff distance to payload target, altitude, wind conditions, etc.)

In the Phase II CPADS effort CH Robotics will take advantage of its expertise in developing low-cost, reliable AHRS and Orientation Sensors to implement an autopilot to guide the CPADS glider from its initial release position to the payload delivery location without human interference. CH Robotics will also cooperate with SeaLandAire Technologies to develop a modular airframe.

About CH Robotics

CH Robotics specializes in the development of attitude and heading sensors for industrial, commercial, and research applications.  By taking advantage of state-of-the-art MEMS sensing technology in conjunction with a rapidly growing market for low-cost inertial and orientation sensors, CH Robotics delivers high performance sensors at industry-leading prices.